asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller
Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics. He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot. This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.
"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."Pablo Picasso asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller
Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics. He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot. This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.
"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."Pablo Picasso asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller
Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics. He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot. This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.
"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."Pablo Picasso asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller
Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics. He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot. This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.
"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."Pablo Picasso asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller
Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics. He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot. This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.
"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."Pablo Picasso asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller
Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics. He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot. This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.
"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."Pablo Picasso asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller
Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics. He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot. This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.
"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."Pablo Picasso asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller
Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics. He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot. This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.
"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."Pablo Picasso

asylum-art:

Dripping of sculptures by Adrien Coroller

Adrien COROLLER is an artist who likes to play with wood and its aspects to contradict the physical characteristics.
He made 2011 a series of sculptures called Heartwood, the heartwood is the internal part of the wood, corresponding to the increase in the oldest areas formed, no longer contain living cells. Also called “heart wood” or “heartwood”, it is a hard wood, compact, dense, dry rot.
This is in contradiction with all these qualities and fun that the artist gives us the impression that his wooden frames are melting as if they were made of chocolate.

"Every act of creation is first an act of destruction."
Pablo Picasso

asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object. asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui 
We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object.

asylum-art:

Classical statues dissected by Cao Hui

We already talked about the Chinese artist Cao Hui and his strange organic furnitures (strange organic sculptures by Cao Hui). After giving your home a little touch of museum of horrors, Cao Hui demystifies the statues of classical sculpture by dissecting them, cutting them, to break the separation between organic and inorganic matter, between animate and inanimate object.

asylum-art:

 Nicole Dextras freezes garments in solid blocks of ice
using ice as both her photographic and sculptural medium, environmental artist nicole dextras freezes garments of varying season, texture, and fabric in frosted volumes, highlighting the wardrobe’s skeletal qualities. the series that makes up ‘castaways’ has been captured on toronto island, a small community celebrated for its beach and amusement park open during the warm months, while the winter period leaves the town somewhat devoid of its usual summertime energy. with this in mind, dextras imagines the apparel representing the spirits of the theme park frozen in time, out of season, waiting for the great melt. the ephemeral nature of the urban sculptural installations invite the viewer to construct their own narrative as the artist explains, ‘like an isolated silent film still, they exist only for a moment and then the movie continues on.’  asylum-art:

 Nicole Dextras freezes garments in solid blocks of ice
using ice as both her photographic and sculptural medium, environmental artist nicole dextras freezes garments of varying season, texture, and fabric in frosted volumes, highlighting the wardrobe’s skeletal qualities. the series that makes up ‘castaways’ has been captured on toronto island, a small community celebrated for its beach and amusement park open during the warm months, while the winter period leaves the town somewhat devoid of its usual summertime energy. with this in mind, dextras imagines the apparel representing the spirits of the theme park frozen in time, out of season, waiting for the great melt. the ephemeral nature of the urban sculptural installations invite the viewer to construct their own narrative as the artist explains, ‘like an isolated silent film still, they exist only for a moment and then the movie continues on.’  asylum-art:

 Nicole Dextras freezes garments in solid blocks of ice
using ice as both her photographic and sculptural medium, environmental artist nicole dextras freezes garments of varying season, texture, and fabric in frosted volumes, highlighting the wardrobe’s skeletal qualities. the series that makes up ‘castaways’ has been captured on toronto island, a small community celebrated for its beach and amusement park open during the warm months, while the winter period leaves the town somewhat devoid of its usual summertime energy. with this in mind, dextras imagines the apparel representing the spirits of the theme park frozen in time, out of season, waiting for the great melt. the ephemeral nature of the urban sculptural installations invite the viewer to construct their own narrative as the artist explains, ‘like an isolated silent film still, they exist only for a moment and then the movie continues on.’  asylum-art:

 Nicole Dextras freezes garments in solid blocks of ice
using ice as both her photographic and sculptural medium, environmental artist nicole dextras freezes garments of varying season, texture, and fabric in frosted volumes, highlighting the wardrobe’s skeletal qualities. the series that makes up ‘castaways’ has been captured on toronto island, a small community celebrated for its beach and amusement park open during the warm months, while the winter period leaves the town somewhat devoid of its usual summertime energy. with this in mind, dextras imagines the apparel representing the spirits of the theme park frozen in time, out of season, waiting for the great melt. the ephemeral nature of the urban sculptural installations invite the viewer to construct their own narrative as the artist explains, ‘like an isolated silent film still, they exist only for a moment and then the movie continues on.’  asylum-art:

 Nicole Dextras freezes garments in solid blocks of ice
using ice as both her photographic and sculptural medium, environmental artist nicole dextras freezes garments of varying season, texture, and fabric in frosted volumes, highlighting the wardrobe’s skeletal qualities. the series that makes up ‘castaways’ has been captured on toronto island, a small community celebrated for its beach and amusement park open during the warm months, while the winter period leaves the town somewhat devoid of its usual summertime energy. with this in mind, dextras imagines the apparel representing the spirits of the theme park frozen in time, out of season, waiting for the great melt. the ephemeral nature of the urban sculptural installations invite the viewer to construct their own narrative as the artist explains, ‘like an isolated silent film still, they exist only for a moment and then the movie continues on.’  asylum-art:

 Nicole Dextras freezes garments in solid blocks of ice
using ice as both her photographic and sculptural medium, environmental artist nicole dextras freezes garments of varying season, texture, and fabric in frosted volumes, highlighting the wardrobe’s skeletal qualities. the series that makes up ‘castaways’ has been captured on toronto island, a small community celebrated for its beach and amusement park open during the warm months, while the winter period leaves the town somewhat devoid of its usual summertime energy. with this in mind, dextras imagines the apparel representing the spirits of the theme park frozen in time, out of season, waiting for the great melt. the ephemeral nature of the urban sculptural installations invite the viewer to construct their own narrative as the artist explains, ‘like an isolated silent film still, they exist only for a moment and then the movie continues on.’ 

asylum-art:

 Nicole Dextras freezes garments in solid blocks of ice

using ice as both her photographic and sculptural medium, environmental artist nicole dextras freezes garments of varying season, texture, and fabric in frosted volumes, highlighting the wardrobe’s skeletal qualities. the series that makes up ‘castaways’ has been captured on toronto island, a small community celebrated for its beach and amusement park open during the warm months, while the winter period leaves the town somewhat devoid of its usual summertime energy. with this in mind, dextras imagines the apparel representing the spirits of the theme park frozen in time, out of season, waiting for the great melt. the ephemeral nature of the urban sculptural installations invite the viewer to construct their own narrative as the artist explains, ‘like an isolated silent film still, they exist only for a moment and then the movie continues on.’ 

asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope

asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.

Padlock and Key, c 1580
Southern Germany, Steel

Helmet (Morion), c 1580
Northern Italy, Steel

Gauntlet, c 1580
Northern Italy, Steel

Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525
Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel

Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702
Germany – Steel, brass

Casket, c 1570-1600
Germany, Steelcartwork.

Cranequin, c 1565-1574
Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope

asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.



asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church
Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.

asylum-art:

Magnificent Scribbled Line Digital Portraits by Ayaka Ito & Randy Church

Artists like Ayaka Ito use computer programming to create something new and exciting.Graphic designer and illustrator Ito, who originally hails from Japan but currently resides in New York City, tells us that she began her Scribbled Line People project in 2008 for a ’3D Motion & Particle’ course offered at her alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a history of incorporating photography into her artwork but adding an element of programming couldn’t have been accomplished without her collaborator Randy Church. The duo used applications like Flash and Photoshop to break down the photographic images and build them back up into intriguing portraits composed of a series of interweaving lines.

tastefullyoffensive:

Baby bat in a Batman sock, used to protect his injured wing. [x]

malformalady:

Takayuki Hori creates origami or Oritsunagumono(translated as ‘things folded and connected’) with translucent material printed with animal skeletons. Hori creates his works created to highlight the environmental threat of pollution to a number of species native to japan’s coastal waterways. Each translucent sheet is first printed with either the images of fragments of an animal’s skeleton, or, on some pages, human-made discarded objects that are often ingested by the animals in the wild. Using the ancient tradition of folded paper, hori assembles the pages into a three-dimensional model. Once the paper is folded, the printed components are united as a whole, telling the visual story of the animal’s plight to survive in an increasingly polluted and hazardous ecosystem.
asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance. asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance. asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance. asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance. asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance. asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance. asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance. asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance. asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales
Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance.

asylum-art:

Rafael Sottolichio: Hallucinatory Tales

Rafael Sottolichio  is a Quebec-based painter with a talent for creating hallucinatory tales. His dream-like portraits often includes trailed liquids, vivid colours and random geometric shapes to throw any observer off-guard and into an astral trance.